Fairey Delta
Fairey Delta by Novo/Frog
1/72 scale
Decals: One version, for the world speed record-breaking aircraft, WG774
Comments:  Old kit, hard to find intact; engraved panel lines

First flown on October 6, 1954, the Fairey Delta II was a research aircraft that investigated the problems of traveling at high speeds just short of the speed of sound.  The body of data it developed helped to make jet fighters more efficient at sub-sonic speeds.  On March 10, 1965, aircraft WG774, piloted by Lt. Commander Peter Twiss, D.S.C., set a new Official World Speed Record of 1, 132 mph -- 310 mph over the previous record. WG 774 was later modified to become BAC 221, the aircraft used for high speed tests and related development of the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic airliner.   Like the Concorde, the Fairey Delta had a hinged nose, providing the pilot an improved view when landing, and taxiing for take-off.
Powerplant: One Rolls Royce Avon RA.28 turbojet, capable of 10,050 lbs. of thrust
Maximum speed:  1,188 mph at altitudes above 36,000 feet

The Kit
Novo's Fairey Delta is molded in dark grey and consists of 35 injection molded parts.  There is no pilot figure, no internal cockpit , and the landing gear are not particularly detailed.  Since it was a research aircraft it has no under wing stores.  The kit has the simplistic feel of a demonstration model destined to adorn an executive's desk.  Given the age of the kit (mid-1970's would be a guess) and it's simplicity, it is a shock to find that it has engraved panel lines, the kind of detail you'd expect an executive to demand. 
A very simple but historic kit of a record-setting aircraft.  Highly recommended.

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